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Neil Megson, Genesis P-Orridge, and Genesis Breyer P-Orridge

Neil Megson, Genesis P-Orridge, and Genesis Breyer P-Orridge

Jeffrey Kastner in-print Art Forum review (page 176-177 OCTOBER 2021 issue)

A cheerfully ferocious “wrecker of civilization”—kin to Aleister Crowley and Austin Osman Spare, to William Burroughs and Brion Gysin, to Fluxus and Viennese Actionism—Genesis Breyer P-Orridge (1950–2020) occupied a crucial position at the nexus of interrelated postwar artistic streams for nearly a half century. “TIME=EMIT,” a recent show of the shape-shifting provocateur’s work at No Gallery, was billed with fitting impertinence as “a three-person solo exhibition,” revealing a sliver of the object-based strand of the polymath’s sprawling career via he/r tripartite personal and artistic identity. (P-Orridge adopted the pronouns he/r and s/he as they were third gender.) The twenty-odd works on view sketched a portrait of a figure constitutionally driven to translate he/r experience in the world via a program of making and remaking, one that extended to he/r very subjectivity.